TV

Glasses Malone’s Candid Discussion: What Makes an Artist Truly Hip-Hop?

todayOctober 26, 2023 3889 42 5

Background
share close

In a recent episode of The Podcast, , also referred to as G Malone, brought his unique perspective to the forefront while discussing what defines hip-hop and why he believes artists like Drake and do not fit the bill. Known for his roots in the rugged streets of Watts and Compton in , G Malone has been a prominent figure in the rap scene.

“When you understand hip-hop and Street Urban , there is no greater representation of culture than Snoop Dog,” Malone began, highlighting 's profound influence on the genre. He went on to express his view that artists like and Kanye West, who do not come from a street urban background, do not align with the essence of hip-hop.

Malone argued that hip-hop is deeply rooted in street urban culture, and artists who do not share this background should not be considered true representatives of the genre. He pointed out that even renowned artists like , hailing from Detroit, are exceptions, given their connection to the culture of their communities.

The chat got really interesting when Malone stated that coming from a middle-class background automatically knocked you out of the hip-hop club. He made a big deal about how being from a street urban neighborhood was a must to be a genuine hip-hop representative.

While the host of the podcast disagrees with Malone's perspective, the OG maintained that hip-hop is a unique form of artistic expression tied to street urban culture.

Malone also brought up a point about folks like P. who've moved into the executive side of the biz. He wondered if they could still be considered part of the hip-hop scene. He gave props to their contributions but saw a clear line between their roles and the heart of hip-hop culture.

The discussion further explored the influence of artists like Kanye West and their impact on the genre. Malone recognized Kanye's significant influence but continued to grapple with the idea of whether he truly represents hip-hop in its authentic form.

During the interview, the host posed a question to Malone regarding his opinion on Lil Yachty. In response, the OG rapper commented, saying, “Do you look at Lil Yachty and be like oh that's a hip-hop guy?” The host affirmed with a simple “yeah.” In response, Malone stated, “No… you just only feel like that cuz he raps.” However, the host disagreed, responding with: “No I think he's hip-hop for sure. I also think that he contributed a lot to the culture.”

The conversation rolled on as Bootleg Kev shared his take on hip-hop, sparking a lively back-and-forth with the experienced rapper. Travis Scott's name also entered the mix. Malone pointed out that Travis Scott's music mainly attracts a middle-class crowd, underlining the particular audience he connected with. Furthermore, Malone suggested that Travis Scott himself might not even see himself as a hip-hop artist, further blurring the lines within the genre.

So, in this podcast, you can totally see that Bootleg Kev just can't wrap his head around what Malone's trying to explain. It's all about the difference between the pop culture and hip-hop. See, pop music, it's all about being popular, right? It's designed to be super mainstream and listener-friendly. It's the kind of stuff you'd hear in your favorite mall. But here's the kicker, street music, the real deal hip-hop, doesn't get the same love. It's often explicit, and you won't be jamming to it at the local mall, that's for sure.

Dilemaradio gets where Malone is coming from, and has been trying to hammer home this point for a while. It's tough to explain this to folks who just follow whatever's on the Billboard charts. See, Dilemaradio is an independent radio station, and sure, we'll drop some popular hits here and there, but the main groove is giving rap music and that authentic street sound a platform. We know that artists like Travis Scott and Lil Yachty might not vibe with our audience because we're all about representing that raw Hip-Hop essence. If you're only looking at what's being pushed by the mainstream, you're missing out on the street sound. People love to say rap is dead, but nah, it's very much alive and kickin' in our world.

And so, while Glasses Malone's views on hip-hop remained a bit of a puzzle for some, the chat dove deep into what makes artists relatable and the part pop culture plays in the big picture of mainstream America. It's like a window into the complex world of defining hip-hop and how it's always changing and evolving.

In the end, hip-hop isn't just a genre; it's a mirror reflecting our ever-shifting society, and it's here to stay, full of vitality and growth.

If you love hip-hop, be sure to listen to our radio station “Dilemaradio”. We play hip-hop music around the clock, just as it is. It's where you can enjoy uncensored rap music that defines hip-hop's culture. Join us and stay connected to the heart of hip-hop without any restrictions.

Watch The Full Interview: Glasses Malone on Why Drake & Kanye are Not Hip-Hop

Written by: Silvia Tine

Rate it

About

Dilemaradio is a leading platform for hip hop news and media, established in 2017. The website offers a variety of features such as a monthly hip hop music chart and a radio station featuring uncensored rap and hip hop music | learn more.

RADIO STREAMS